Japanese Invent RPS Robotic Godzilla!

rps robotHaving robots play RPS is nothing new around here. Heck, we have dozens around the World RPS office that continually engage each other in Robot wars type duels (our resident IT guy James Hagherty can generally be seen at lunch hour tinkering with some  new robotic creation that ends up creating more smoke than game play), but a new technology threatens to end human dominance of the grand sport of RPS.  Not only will this robot play RPS but it has fast enough reactions to trounce any human that challenges it

Developed by Hiroshima University Robotics Laboratory this robot can react to the movements of a player as they release their throw in the final approach in under 0.2 seconds. Now the good news for players is that 0.2 seconds is still too slow a reaction time for most play on the professional circuit, but less experienced player may need to improve their priming delivery times if they find themselves up against this RPS Godzilla.

The implications of this are far reaching considering that the World RPS Society has allowed computer aided opponents (The Discovery Channel’s Deeper Blue see video for their coverage)  to compete in previous World Championships. We would expect that future versions of this robot could get this timing down even further.

This just might be what it takes to get the WRPSS Steering Committee off their collective butts to ban computer-aid outright for the good of the sport. 

Link comes from jspy.us

 

rps robotHaving robots play RPS is nothing new around here. Heck, we have dozens around the World RPS office that continually engage each other in Robot wars type duels (our resident IT guy James Hagherty can generally be seen at lunch hour tinkering with some  new robotic creation that ends up creating more smoke than game play), but a new technology threatens to end human dominance of the grand sport of RPS.  Not only will this robot play RPS but it has fast enough reactions to trounce any human that challenges it

Developed by Hiroshima University Robotics Laboratory this robot can react to the movements of a player as they release their throw in the final approach in under 0.2 seconds. Now the good news for players is that 0.2 seconds is still too slow a reaction time for most play on the professional circuit, but less experienced player may need to improve their priming delivery times if they find themselves up against this RPS Godzilla.

The implications of this are far reaching considering that the World RPS Society has allowed computer aided opponents (The Discovery Channel’s Deeper Blue see video for their coverage)  to compete in previous World Championships. We would expect that future versions of this robot could get this timing down even further. This just might be what it takes to get the WRPSS Steering Committee off their collective butts to ban computer-aid outright for the good of the sport.

Link comes from jspy.us

 

Posted in RPS News and Notes