SMUSHED : Fist Full of Fuey at Rock Paper Scissors Championship

Smushed

Noticed a 2-part article on Newsvine.com that covered the 2003 World Championships. If you have never competed at the World-class level, it is a very good read of the kind of game play and atmosphere you can expect at the World Championships.


We’re at Kool Haus, a popular nightspot in downtown Toronto. A video camera is trained at my mug capturing my intense crazy-insane furrowed eyebrow look that says, “Welcome to Sing-Sing, you’re in my cell block now.” Fox Sports is taping the event. CNN is also on hand. There are at least a hundred other reporters representing the whole media spectrum everyone from regional fish-wrap titles to Forbes is here for the show.


Generally we find that people who talk about RPS as being a game of chance have never been to the World Championships. The reporter Mike Dojc later in the article nails the notion that players do feel responsible for their own losses.


Despite popular conception that RPS is a game of pure chance, everybody I talked to in loser’s row felt responsible for their own failure: they didn’t train hard enough, they should have seen a throw coming, they felt intimidated by their opponent. The litany of excuses was endless.


This article originally appeared in Chill Magazine, so it’s great that it has been republished on Newsvine. You can read the full article here 

 

Smushed

Noticed a 2-part article on Newsvine.com that covered the 2003 World Championships. If you have never competed at the World-class level, it is a very good read of the kind of game play and atmosphere you can expect at the World Championships.


We’re at Kool Haus, a popular nightspot in downtown Toronto. A video camera is trained at my mug capturing my intense crazy-insane furrowed eyebrow look that says, “Welcome to Sing-Sing, you’re in my cell block now.” Fox Sports is taping the event. CNN is also on hand. There are at least a hundred other reporters representing the whole media spectrum everyone from regional fish-wrap titles to Forbes is here for the show.


Generally we find that people who talk about RPS as being a game of chance have never been to the World Championships. The reporter Mike Dojc later in the article nails the notion that players do feel responsible for their own losses.


Despite popular conception that RPS is a game of pure chance, everybody I talked to in loser’s row felt responsible for their own failure: they didn’t train hard enough, they should have seen a throw coming, they felt intimidated by their opponent. The litany of excuses was endless.


This article originally appeared in Chill Magazine, so it’s great that it has been republished on Newsvine. You can read the full article here 

 

Posted in RPS News and Notes